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  • Caine Dairy Teaching and Research Center

    Before dawn Shan Sherwood is at work at the Caine Dairy Research and Teaching Center. About 100 cows greet the milking crew there each day and thanks to them (the crew and the cows), the pipeline to the Aggie Creamery and all that delicious chees and Aggie Ice Cream never runs dry

  • Logan-Cache Airport

    Austin Bartschi, a student in the aviation program in the School of Applied Sciences, Technology and Education, prepares aircraft for flight before taking off. Students in this program get hours of hands-on experience before graduating with their degrees and moving on to work with some of the biggest airlines in the industry.

  • Equine Center Foal Watch

    Second-year students in USU’s School of Veterinary Medicine stayed overnight at the Matthew Hillyard Animal, Teaching and Research Center to help this mare successfully give birth to her foal. Throughout the night, students checked the mare every hour to monitor her progress and determine how close she was to foaling.

  • Cache High School

    Dietetics students took their knowledge and cooking skills to Cache High School each week of the semester, weaving information about nutrition, physiology and food into the school’s science curriculum. Once each week, teams of our dieticians-in-training taught lessons and then prepared and served lunch for the school’s 140+ students (who normally eat lunches they packed from home). Our students worked wonders with a small budget, food donations from some local businesses, and incorporating produce grown in Cache High’s student-run greenhouse

  • Landscape Architecture

    Students in the Department of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning are no strangers to big projects. Working to make every detail of their designs perfect, students often spend long hours in the studio. Here, a student puts the finishing touches on her final project of the semester.

  • Patagonia Worn Wear Festival

    Our Outdoor Product Design and Development program hosted the Patagonia Worn Wear Re-Festival on the Quad on USU’s Logan campus. Students took their torn, worn-out clothing and gear to Patagonia’s sewing technicians to be repaired rather than thrown away. Those in attendance also learned more about sustainability from Patagonia and student and community groups.

  • Teaching Greenhouse

    Craig Aston is right at home as he teaches a class in one of several greenhouses on campus. Under his direction, students learn about producing fruit and vegetable crops, commercial landscape construction and managing home gardens.

  • Sewing Class

    Students in the clothing construction lab help each other troubleshoot their projects. The lab is a busy spot for students in Outdoor Product Design and Development and those pursuing degrees in Family and Consumer Sciences Education.

  • Albrecht Agricultural Sciences Building

    Just about any day in CAAS you’ll find Dean Ken White in a meeting…or two, or three. This time the meeting was in his office discussing plans with CAAS Director of Development Brandon Monson

  • North Logan

    If you are an aviation major in our School of Applied Sciences, sometimes “field trips” come to you. This day our students got an close up look at U.S. Army UH-60 Blackhawk helicopters that were part of an annual visit, courtesy of USU’s Army ROTC program. Our students explorec the interior of these aircraft and talked with the pilots and crew members.If you are an aviation major in our School of Applied Sciences, sometimes “field trips” come to you. This day our students got an close up look at U.S. Army UH-60 Blackhawk helicopters that were part of an annual visit, courtesy of USU’s Army ROTC program. Our students explorec the interior of these aircraft and talked with the pilots and crew members. (PS: The helicopter in the air did not suddenly drop to the ground after this photo. The blades were actually still moving, but captured by the camera’s very fast shutter speed.)

  • Skaggs Family Equine Education Center

    Equine science students were doing what they love; getting at least one ride in for the day. It isn’t all riding though. Students in the program study animal nutrition and reproduction, physiology and equine event management.

  • Tours

    Our college has several world-class facilities, all designed to help students gain hands-on experience. Here, academic advisor Kaylee Roholt is taking the new crew of CAAS Ambassadors on a tour of the Jet Engine Test Cell, where aviation students and faculty can safely test-run reciprocating and turbine engines.

  • Grandfriends Lunch

    Dietetics students invited their “grandfriends” on campus for a Wellness Luncheon featuring nutritious and tasty dishes, such as bacon-wrapped sweet potatoes. As part of a service learning opportunity, the dietetics students spent spring semester visiting the Williamsburg Retirement Community and teaching the “grandfriends” various relaxation and mindfulness techniques, the importance of having a “tribe,” ways to practice creativity, and the health benefits of foods from around the world.

  • Utah Public Radio Studio

    It was meteorologist Martin Schroeder’s turn at the microphone in the Utah Public Radio studio because in addition to gathering and studying a lot of data, teaching and producing research papers for top-notch journals, some faculty and student scientists at the Utah Climate Center are also radio personalities. They develop and deliver daily forecasts that are broadcast statewide and beyond.

  • Research Symposium

    During USU Research Week, over 300 graduate and undergraduate students gave presentations about their research. Here, nutrition students tell interested guests about their study involving bioactive components found in tart cherries and black raspberries that can potentially help people with chronic gut inflammation.

  • Marie Walsh's Lab

    In CAAS, students often get the chance to participate in groundbreaking research. Marie Walsh, a food science professor, has several undergraduate and graduate researchers conducting experiments to improve food safety and extend the shelf life of milk by controlling and reducing bacteria.

  • Tractor Shop

    Students in the Ag Tech Club work on tractors and other projects in the high bay at the Applied Sciences, Technology and Education Building. By getting this hands-on experience, students are increasing their knowledge and developing skills that are specific to equipment used in the agricultural industry.

  • South Farm Cattle Branding

    Brett Bowman, beef cattle manager and production lecturer in the Department of Animal, Dairy and Veterinary Science, discusses with students the importance of identification and teaches them how to how to hot brand cattle at USU’s South Farm. Students had the opportunity to get hands-on experience with hot branding and other types of identification, such as freeze branding and tattooing

  • Blue Creek Research Farm

    Soil is “earth” and the foundation of life on Earth. And if you are a soil scientist you spend lots of time in the field gathering samples like graduate student Kareem Adeleke was on this day at the Utah Agricultural Experiment Station’s Blue Creek Farm in Box Elder County.

  • Kaysville Research Farm

    Finding ways to grow food on less farmland is increasingly important. Professor Brent Black and graduate student Sheriden Hansen are putting closely spaced and carefully pruned fruit trees to the test at the Utah Agricultural Experiment Station’s Kaysville Research Farm

  • Crop Physiology Laboratory

    Photosynthesis is a remarkable and vital process for plants, turning light into food. But what about plants that are not exposed to sunlight, and what difference does the color of artificial light have on them? Undergraduate student researcher Boston Swan re-engineered these growth chambers in the Crop Physiology Lab where she works with Professor Bruce Bugbee, and is involved in ongoing work that is important to growing crops in controlled environments, including aboard spacecraft and, hopefully, someday on Mars.

  • South Farm Beef Production Class

    Codi Blanchard, Ian Sroufe and Maddie Johnson watch and learn as Dr. Rusty Stott and Brett Bowman teach students how to perform a breeding soundness exam (BSE). Students in the beef production class performed a BSE and evaluated the overall health and condition of four different bulls at USU’s South Farm

  • Albrecht Agricultural Sciences Building

    Landscape design and construction is all about creatively solving problems. On this day, students in Ann Spranger’s residential landscape design class were presenting and discussing their beautiful and practical solutions to various landscape challenges.

  • Teaching Greenhouse

    Students were at work in one of the most beautiful labs on campus. The Teaching Greenhouse west of Maverick Stadium was in full swing by this day in mid-April.

  • South Farm

    TTextbooks are fine, but if you are studying animal science, you need to work with animals. It was a busy day at the South Farm (every day is) and these were just a few of the students who were at work in a “classroom” with a view.

  • Ernstrom Nutrition and Food Sciences Building

    It may taste magical, but producing Aggie Ice Cream requires skill and plenty of work. Today was a production day and delicious ice cream was being put into individual-serving cups. An average batch of ice cream is 250 delicious gallons and fills 7,000 cups.

  • South Farm Dairy Surgery

    Students observe as Drs. Rusty Stott and Lexie Sweat work together to perform surgery on one of the dairy cows at the Matthew Hillyard Animal, Teaching and Research Center. Thanks to their quick work and expertise, she made a speedy recovery and is now back home at the dairy.

  • Albrecht Agricultural Sciences Building Plaza

    It was pruning day for trees on the plaza. The London plane trees are being trained with a very specific type of pruning called pollarding that will develop a very distinctive canopy. The morning light also created a shadow puppet show on the memorial.

  • Blue Creek Research Farm

    The important work of developing new wheat varieties that resist evolving diseases and testing crop management practices can’t all be done in a lab or a greenhouse. It requires farms and the Utah Agricultural Experiment Station (UAES) has provided those living, outdoor laboratories for scientists since 1888. The Blue Creek Research Farm got its start in the early 1960s when farmers in Box Elder County purchased 40 acres and deeded it to the UAES for research. Work done at Blue Creek continues to benefit dryland farmers and occasionally gives CAAS scientists a beautiful view they can’t get on campus